8 Tips for Removing a Tea Stain

8 Tips for Removing a Tea Stain

8 Tips for Removing a Tea Stain

 

 Contents

 1. Cleaning a tea stain from leather

 2. Removing a tea stain from fabric or clothing

 3. Removing tea stains from wood

 4. Cleaning tea stains from floors and walls

 5. Removing tea stains from smooth surfaces

 6. Removing tea stains from metal

 7. Cleaning tea stains from stone

 8. Detergents for removing tea stains

 

 Tea stains are more resistant than you might think. To remove a tea stain, take action as soon as the stain occurs.

 1. Cleaning tea stains from leather

 To remove a tea stain from leather

 Mix water and rubbing alcohol together.

 Apply the mixture to the stain with a sponge.

 On suede

 Dab the stain with a sponge of water and vinegar.

 If the stain remains, mix soap and warm glycerine.

 On nubuck

 Prepare a solution containing vinegar and rubbing alcohol.

 Apply this solution to the stain.

 2. Removing a tea stain from fabric or clothing

 A tea stain on fabric can be challenging to remove.

 On a synthetic fabric

 Rub the stain with a cloth soaked in the juice of a lemon.

 Dip the fabric in water.

 On cotton

 Dab the stain with sodium perborate.

 Other effective detergents: are white vinegar with 90° alcohol and soap.

 On jeans

 If the stain is fresh, rub it with a cloth soaked in soap and water.

 If the stain is set in, add warm glycerine to the fabric.

 Other effective detergents are white vinegar with 90° alcohol and sodium perborate.

 On linen

 Scrub immediately with a sponge of soapy water.

 Dab with a cloth soaked in vinegar.

 If the stain remains:

 Heat some glycerine.

 Mix it with water and soap.

 Soak a cloth in the mixture and apply it to the stain.

 Other effective detergents: are white vinegar with 90° alcohol and sodium perborate.

 On silk, satin, or velvet

 Mix vinegar and rubbing alcohol.

 Rub the stain with a cloth soaked in the solution.

 Other effective detergents: are glycerine, soap, and sodium perborate.

 On wool

 Rub the fabric with a cotton cloth soaked in liquid soap.

 Dip the wool in water and vinegar.

 If the stain is stubborn, repeat the operation by adding warm glycerine to the detergents.

 Other effective detergents: are white vinegar with 90° alcohol and sodium perborate.

 On goat or sheepskin or natural fur

 Apply a cloth soaked in rubbing alcohol and vinegar to the stain.

 Other effective detergents: are glycerine and soap.

 On synthetic fur

 Rub the stain with a cloth soaked in lemon.

 Wipe with a damp cloth.

 On waxed canvas

 Sponge the stain immediately with soap.

 If the stain is dry, add lemon juice.

 Other effective detergents: sodium perborate, 90° alcohol, glycerine, and vinegar.

 3. Removing a tea stain from wood

8 Tips for Removing a Tea Stain

 Here’s how to remove a tea stain from wood.

 On white wood

 Rub the stain gently in the direction of the grooves with a square of sandpaper until it disappears completely.

 On waxed wood

 Dab cotton wool soaked in ammonia onto the stain.

 Sponge.

 Wipe off.

 Treat with wax, if necessary.

 Another effective detergent is scouring powder.

 On painted wood

 Dry polish the stain with a clean cloth.

 Prepare a solution of olive oil, methylated spirits, and turpentine.

 Rub the stain with a cloth moistened in this mixture.

 Wipe with a cloth soaked in linseed oil.

 On teak

 A tea stain on the teak is easily removed by rubbing it with a cloth and water.

 4. Cleaning a tea stain on a floor or wall

 Depending on the surface, a tea stain on a floor or wall can be removed more or less quickly.

 On natural fibers (sea rush, jute, coir)

 Dab the stain with a tissue moistened with ammonia.

 Vacuum the stain.

 Other effective detergents: are soap and carpet cleaner.

 On sisal

 Press a sheet of blotting paper on the stain.

 Note: if you don’t have blotting paper, this technique also works with a tissue or paper towel.

 Then sprinkle with dry carpet stain remover powder.

 Note: Sisal is not water-resistant; therefore, permanent marks may remain.

 On carpeting

 Dab a cloth soaked in white vinegar on the stain.

 Another effective detergent is rubbing alcohol at 90°.

 For stubborn stains:

 Spray shaving cream on the area.

 Scrub vigorously with a brush.

 Wipe off the foam with a cloth.

 Rinse off.

 Allow drying.

 On linoleum

 Mop with liquid black soap and soda crystals.

 Rinse.

 Allow drying.

 On tiles

 Rub the stain with a cloth soaked in diluted black soap and starch.

 Wash with clean water.

 On cement or concrete

 Rub the stain with a sponge moistened with liquid scouring powder.

 Clean the sponge and wipe it over the treated area.

 On brick

 Place an absorbent cloth over the area to loosen some tea stains.

 Apply cotton wool soaked in rubbing alcohol to the stain.

 Be careful: the stain is dry if it does not come out.

 Gently dab the stain with a cloth moistened with vinegar and rubbing alcohol.

 For non-washable wallpaper: rub the stain with a breadcrumb.

 5. Removing a tea stain from a smooth floor

 Smooth surfaces with tea stains are easy to clean.

 On plastic or rubber

 Place a tissue on the stain to absorb the liquid.

 Apply a cloth soaked in scouring powder and water.

 Rinse.

 Wipe with a dry cloth to dry.

 On glass, window, or crystal

 Soak dishes in a bath of hot vinegar and water.

 Rinse.

 If any residue remains, repeat the operation until the stain has completely disappeared.

 Other effective detergents: are bleach, bicarbonate of soda, and sodium perborate.

 On ceramics, earthenware, or porcelain

 Leave to stand in a basin of hot water with bleach added.

 Remove the residue under the tap with clean water.

 Other effective detergents: are bicarbonate of soda, sodium perborate, and vinegar.

 On enamel

 Rub enamel with cotton wool moistened with sodium perborate.

 Sponge.

 Other effective detergents: are baking soda, bleach, and vinegar.

 6. Removing a tea stain from metal

 Cleaning a tea stain on metal often requires very aggressive products: protect your face and hands.

 On stainless steel

 Rub the stain with a cloth sprinkled with soda ash.

 On copper

 Gently rub the stain with a steel wool brush dipped in diluted oxalic acid.

 On brass

 Scrub the stain with a sponge of soapy water.

 Polish.

 7. Cleaning a tea stain on stone

 A damp sponge will easily remove a tea stain from stone.

 If this is not satisfactory:

 Mix hydrogen peroxide with water.

 Apply the solution to the stain with a cloth.

 Another effective detergent is scouring powder or bleach.

 On marble

 Dilute ammonia and lye in hot water.

 Rub this mixture into the stain with a steel wool brush.

 Sponge.

 On stoneware

 If possible, blot the stain immediately.

 Rub the stain with a sponge containing diluted scouring powder.

 Rinse.

 On granite

 Wipe with a cloth soaked in liquid black soap.

 Rub in a stain remover to protect the granite from future incidents.

 8. Detergents for removing tea stains

 Liquid black soap

 Organic washing powder

 Hydrogen peroxide

 Oxalic acid (sorrel salt)

 Can of bleach

 Alcohol at 90

 Starch spray

 Bag of soda crystals

 Dry shampoo for carpets and rugs

 Shaving foam

 Linseed oil

 Extra green olive oil

 Burning alcohol

 Bottle of sodium perborate

 Vegetable glycerine

 Sandpaper

 Turpentine oil

 Linseed oil

 Ammonia

 White vinegar

 Scouring powder

 Lemon

 Soda ash

 Soap

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